The play's the thing


Yesterday, I played soccer.

Though it may sound odd to say so, it feels like the most significant thing I've done so far this year. I played soccer! I feel like a different person, while playing soccer. I feel stronger, smarter, freer, unencumbered. It's the play I've been missing. Play, as in doing something purely for the fun of it.

I haven't played soccer since August; since the concussion. I was terrified to try again, and wouldn't have without a lot of encouragement from Kevin and AppleApple, both of whom claimed to want me on their team (flattery always wins; actually, so did our team, but that was mostly due to AppleApple hammering in a pile of goals). My touch was lacking, after six months away, but everything else came back in an instant: strategy, positioning, speed, and the ability to run pretty much forever. We played for two hours, and all I could think was: I have to do this again. Soon.

The players were mostly girls from AppleApple's team, with some siblings and dads, and me, the lone mom. I was a bit surprised to be the only adult woman on the field. It was so fun playing with these highly skilled, extremely polite and friendly girls (ages 11/12); I'll bet they'll still be tearing up the soccer field when they're my age. When I was their age, there wasn't anything near the same level of skill-development available for soccer-loving girls, (or probably for soccer-loving boys, either, at least in Canada); I played one season of house league, the summer I was 11. Opportunities have improved for the athletic girl.

I'd love to see more adult women participating in sports: being a participant, a teammate, a competitor gives you a different way of seeing yourself. I think these girls will grow up to be participants, carrying the confidence of their skills. I wish for the skills, but when I get on the field, I find the confidence. And that's what I've missed all these months of not playing: that different way of seeing myself, of being myself.


Mavis Gallant has died. I've been reading and re-reading her stories since discovering her in university. How to describe her style? Her stories are like complex riddles that I'll never entirely puzzle out, and that is their appeal. They offer a clear view into worlds I'll never know, perspectives as precise as they are unfamiliar. Her stories evoke mysterious emotions, and I think that's why I'll never tire of them. She writes of bafflement, of striving and failing and not understanding why one is failing, of being the outsider--always that. My favourite Mavis Gallant story is "The Iceman Going Down the Street." I'd like to tell you to read it, but only if you'll promise to read it at least ten times, perhaps over the course of several years, so that you'll know it and know again, differently, each time.

Goodbye, Mavis. I'll read you forever.

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