Thursday, May 20, 2010

Clear the Counters, Woman!

Experiencing the immobility of disorganization. How can it take so little to throw me off? I stayed out late last night, after rising very early for a wonderful run with a friend, and the more tired I am, the more likely I am to order a second drink. I'm not saying the second drink did me in, but I've been fuzzy-headed for the better part of today. I even forgot to finish drinking my coffee--it languished on the counter till I discovered it cold, at noon.
I am prepping for a birthday party tonight (cooking for 14), and another tomorrow (three boys overnight), and out-of-town guests arriving tomorrow at noon as well. I feel overwhelmed. All of my careful planning is thrown out of whack--no babysitting possible tomorrow, and, there, I've lost half of a week's worth of writing time ... the downside of not working for a living, just working for the sake of it. It feels like my time is therefore disposable; and I resent that. Can you hear it in my voice?
I must get to early morning yoga tomorrow; perhaps that will return me to a sense of balance.
Here's what needs to happen in the next couple of hours: wash all dishes; clear all counters; and prep any food that can be prepped in advance. Tonight's menu: nitrate-free local hot dogs on buns, with sides of baked beans, sauerkraut, potato salad, and avocado salsa, and cake and ice cream for dessert; I am currently stalled on the critical decision of whether to top the cake with whipped cream, or with whipped cream AND homemade chocolate sauce; this is what I mean--I'm stalled on the most insignificant of details, to the point of inertia. I look at the counters and the big dining-room table and go ... what is that stuff, and where does it belong? It appears to be, largely, homeless debris that migrates from surface to surface till it gets recycled, or claimed, in which case the kid carries it to another surface, usually not very far away from the first one, and deposits it again.
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Update on Eco-Attempt # 1: Make your own laundry detergent! Do it! It works! I mixed equal parts Borax and baking soda in a glass jar with a lid, and shook it to combine. I dump two tablespoons of the powdery mixture directly into the washing machine (I have a front-loader; use twice as much with a regular machine), and pour liquid soap into the detergent dispenser tray. The liquid soap is Dr. Brommer's Lavender Castile Soap, which is expensive on first glance, but needs to be heavily diluted to use. So I've filled an old detergent bottle with several squirts of Dr. Brommer's and diluted it with several litres of water. Voila. I hadn't fully thought through the implications of LAVENDER, other than it smelled heavenly to me; but does Kevin want to wear lavender-scented socks? Hopefully so, because the Dr. Brommer's is going to last for a year, I suspect, though it can also be diluted and used around the house, for dish washing and hand-washing, etc.; I may do that. It doesn't completely solve my too-many-plastic-bottles problem, but it will cut down on how many we throw away in a given year.
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Eco-attempt # 3: We made vanilla! It's easy. You buy a couple of vanilla beans, split them, place them in glass canning jars, and pour rum or vodka or some other light alcohol over top, and let them sit for a month or two. Again, relatively inexpensive and will save a lot of little plastic bottles.
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Eco-attempt # 4: List of things I intend to store for this coming winter: 1. Garlic! The sad news is that these are our last three local garlic bulbs; but the good news is that my stores of garlic have lasted this long. I bought them in bulk last fall, and stored them in paper bags in our cold cellar. More garlic this year! 2. Also easily stored are potatoes: again, in paper bags, in the cold cellar. 3. Apples wintered well, there, too. 4. Squash was pretty good, though I wouldn't try to store squash for more than a few months (a pumpkin started to rot). 5. Cabbage kept well in the cold cellar, too, as did 6. carrots, especially in the mid-winter months when the cellar was coldest.
In the freezer, I am now dipping into the last of the frozen 6. plums and 7. apricots. I highly recommend freezing bushels of these. I cut them in half, pit them, and place them into plastic bags and freeze them right away. No sugar pack, nothing. Take them out when you're ready and use them right away, or they will discolour. I stew them with a little water, and serve them over waffles or for my own breakfast of ground seeds and yogurt (don't ask; or do, if you're really curious). I let myself start eating the apricots and plums in January, when a body's longing for summer's tart fruits, and last summer's batch has lasted up till now. I also plan to freeze 8. peas and 9. corn cut off the cob, and 10. tomatoes, in addition to 11. canning more tomatoes or tomato puree. 12. Strawberries also freeze easily, as does (13.) rhubarb, though rhubarb season is usually when I discover that last year's rhubarb is still hanging around in the bottom of the freezer.
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The photo of the kids in their new hats represents the fun time we had at Zeller's, of all places, with the three youngest kids, up past bedtime, earlier this week. Seriously, who in her right mind would be shopping with children at Zeller's at 8:30pm? We were looking for Albus's birthday gifts and ended up having a hoot of a time trying on hats and sunglasses and checking ourselves out in the tiny mirrors. I was in the moment, and it was so freaking fun.
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I seem not to be in the moment right now ... How can get there? Remind me.
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I've promised Fooey that I will help her make cards. And then we'll clear the tables and the counter! Wish me luck. Or better yet, focus.

2 comments:

  1. I'd send you some focus, but I'm short myself. When we were in Australia, people talked about going troppo - the mindless state of ineffectiveness. Today isn't humid enough to be troppo, so let's call it spring fever.

    WHole Lotta Gelato was selling vanilla beans a few weeks ago - health regulations stop them from reusing a vanilla bean so they use them once, briefly, in making vanilla gelato and then have to discard. I haven't used mine yet - I was planning to put them in sugar to make delicious vanilla sugar, but maybe I will make real vanilla with them.

    I made the most amazing apricot spread with frozen apricots this spring - it was mostly just apricots, a teeny bit of water, a small bit of sugar and some lemon juice - boiled into the next world until it became jamlike and so glorious you could eat it with a spoon. And I did.

    Your garlic lasted longer than mine, but mine lasted into April. I planted a bit too - largely for scapes. Mmmm

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  2. And now is when we need scapes!! When do you expect to harvest them? I was just thinking I'd almost made it till scape-season. I refuse to buy garlic from China. But garlic is essential to everything I cook.

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