Sunday, March 7, 2010

Mending

How I can tell I'm on the mend: 1. I wanted to drink a cup of coffee this morning. 2. I'm spending my Sunday baking!
In honour of that, a few recipes ...
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Nath's Bread
(From Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day; this cookbook is on loan from Nath)
Nath brought us supper last night, and she brought a loaf of this bread. Though I wasn't feeling well enough to partake, Kevin mentioned that it was terrific. I don't have the interest in baking a fresh batch of conventional bread today, so I thought instead I'd whip up a giant batch of dough to keep in the fridge, enough to make eight small loaves, which I can bake up at my convenience during the next two weeks. I'd already bought a giant plastic container in which to keep the dough, but hadn't gotten around to making it since borrowing the cookbook, oh, way too long ago. Here's the simple mnemonic: 6-3-3-13. That's six cups of lukewarm water, 3 tbsp salt, 2 tbsp yeast, and 13 cups of flour. I must ask Nath whether she uses that much salt; it looked like a lot to me. [NOTE: When consulted, Nath confirms that is too much salt. She uses half that, and she also uses coarse salt, to in future, I plan to put in approximately 1 tbsp, or even slightly less]. I've mixed up the lot and it is now sitting on my counter to rise for two or so hours. After which, I will pop it in the fridge and pull sections off whenever I feel the urge to add fresh bread to our supper meal.
To bake: cut a grapefruit-sized ball out of the dough, and shape it into a load. Let it rest, uncovered, for 40 minutes. Twenty minutes before baking, turn on the oven at 450 (if you're using a baking stone, pop it in at this time; if you're using a covered pot, like I plan to, also pop it in). Just before baking, dust the load with cornmeal or bran, and slash the top of the dough several times to make it look pretty (this step is not mandatory, especially if you're baking in a pot, in which case, you're going to be dumping it in anyway). Bake the loaf for 30 minutes, approximately. If you're using a baking stone, slip a pan of hot water into your oven on a lower rack; that will add some steam and improve the texture of the crust. If you're using a covered pot, the dough will steam itself. If you're using the pot, you can remove the lid for five to ten minutes of the baking time, to brown the crust.
Note: this makes a smallish loaf. If your family is large, or if you just love bread, double the size of the loaf; I can vouch for this working in the pot, but have never tried it on the stone. In the pot, the baking time for this size is approximately 30 minutes covered, and an additional 10 minutes uncovered. Let cool on a rack. Devour!
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Old-Fashioned Cookie Bars
(adapted from Hollyhocks and Radishes; thanks to Bobbie Chappell for introducing our family to this cookbook, which hails from Northern Michigan)
Cream together 1 cup of softened butter, 1 cup of brown sugar, and 1/2 cup of white sugar. Beat in three eggs. Beat in 1 tbsp of vanilla, and another tbsp or two or three of maple syrup (optional). In a separate bowl, mash one banana, and add it to the wet mixture. In a third bowl, sift together 2 cups of whole wheat flour, 2 cups of white flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 1 tsp baking soda, and 1 tsp salt. Add the sifted dry mixture to the wet mixture in about three batches. As it gets more difficult to incorporate, add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of milk. Stir in 1 cup of oats, 1 cup of sunflower seeds, and 1 cup of chocolate chips.
Spread on a buttered cookie sheet and bake for 20-25 minutes at 350, or until browned around the edges, and not as well-done in the middle. While still hot, cut into squares, and allow the cookie sheet to rest on a rack till completely cooled. Remove from the tray and store.
Note: Baking times vary. When baking bars, be sure to check early rather than late, and don't wait to remove the tray till everything is toasty brown, or you may find the bottom is burnt: get it out while the middle is still a bit underdone. The bars will firm up while cooling.
Also note: This is a very flexible recipe. My first attempt, today, made a crumblier, cakier bar than my previous two bar recipes. Next time, my plan is to eliminate the milk altogether. While I can't recommend this version for lunch-boxes, due to the crumbly/cakey consistency, it is awesomely delicious. Kevin agrees re the taste, and after a quick brainstorm on how to make these bars transportable to school, Kevin is going to try wrapping them individually and freezing them. (Have I mentioned how much I love that he is making the kids' school lunches? He's been doing this for the past couple of weeks while I wash the supper dishes; a companionable time for chatting, too, while the kids tear apart the house post-supper).
Note#2, edited in several days post-posting: Kevin would like the world to know that the frozen bars taste delicious--he ate two when he was home for lunch today, straight out of the freezer. Apparently, they don't freeze into a solid block, but take on a texture much like convenience store freezer treats (in a good way). Frozen into convenient two-piece bundles, they've been excellent additions to the lunch boxes (the few that have gone out the door this week). Maybe I'll make a pan for playgroup this coming week.
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I'd post the Sunday waffle recipe, but my guess is most people already have a favourite waffle recipe in their roster. Mine comes from the Simply In Season cookbook: Whole Wheat Waffles, which I double, and make with a combination of yogurt, and milk soured with vinegar (never having buttermilk on hand, more's the pity).
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It's such a beautiful day. The children have been playing together--all four of them!--virtually non-stop since daybreak. Kevin is playing guitar right now in the living-room, and got out for a jog around the neighbourhood in the brilliant sunshine. I got to listen to CBC Radio One while baking, and was treated to the Sunday Edition's three-hour special honouring International Women's Day, AND THEN, to Tapestry's illumination of the Celtic goddess/saint Brigid (if you're interested, both shows have podcasts). And now I'm blogging. And I can eat again. Have I mentioned that coffee tastes good, too? It's such a perfect day.

2 comments:

  1. I *love* artisan bread in five minutes a day!!!

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  2. I usually make half the bread recipe (for space reasons), so my mnemonic is 3, 1.5, 1.5, 6.5. However, I don't use the full amount of salt (I use 1 tbsp). So the mnemonic really is 3, 1, 1.5, 6.5, which doesn't really roll off the tongue...

    One thing to note - I use 1 tbsp of salt, and it's coarse salt - if I were using regular table salt, I'd reduce it even more, because you get more salt per tbsp if it's finer.

    Also, I usually make the 'light' whole wheat variation, where I substitute a cup of whole wheat flour in the flour amount (so, 1 cup of ww flour and 5.5 cups white flour).

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