A Penny for Your Swears

Can I really take a day off? I've been sick for two weeks, and moving at the usual pace required to maintain our family's happy every day life, and finally asked Kevin last night: Do you think that if I spent a day in bed, it might help me kick this virus? And he said: What are you doing tomorrow? So, CJ and I slept in till 10am!!!! I'm leaving supper up to Kevin (he could pull a soup or stew out of the freezer). And I'm planning to go to hot yoga this afternoon. I skipped my Thursday evening class due to sheer exhaustion.
Kevin and I both operate in similar ways: we both like to improvise. We've made many of our major (and minor) life decisions on the fly, on what might seem gut instinct rather than carefully plotted research, though I like to think our quick-strike decisions actually arrive out of a long, quiet and invisible processing period. One small example: the way I've chosen the "right" time to move babies out of our bed and into their own--each time different, but each time also quite suddenly arriving at a moment when change seemed imperative, and the answer miraculously appeared.
Long explanation for the penny jars you see above, labelled "Movie Jar" and "Respect Jar" (which could also be called "DisRespect Jar," but that doesn't have quite the same positive ring to it). I'd written my previous post on Thursday afternoon, wondering out loud how to educate our family on the larger community and global issues around us, and how to motivate us to act on our values. I appreciate the thoughtful responses that arrived. We're not alone in thinking about this. Kevin and I briefly discussed holding a family meeting, and I scrawled out a few ideas on a piece of paper.
Thursday afternoon, the kids started swim lessons. On the whole, the solo-mom outing went really well; we were all working together. But on the drive home, my cherished eldest son was using language that was not acceptable (mind you, he doesn't use swear words; but the words he was using were equally disrespectful: "fat," "poopy-head," and my all-time fave "butt-brain." Yes, my sweet Albus, when in a fit of frustration, particularly likes to pull that one out of his back pocket.) As we walked through the front door, me laden like an over-worked camel with toddler under one arm, diaper bag and swim bag and someone's snowpants and etc. over the other arm, listening to my half-grown child growl because I'd insisted he carry his own backpack, I said, "We need a swear jar."
(In fact, to make a long story even longer, I'd lost my patience over said backpack. I'd been standing beside the truck, holding it out to him to carry while he destroyed snowballs instead, till finally I'd tossed it into the snowy driveway with a semi-sarcastic comment, which, I was embarrassed to observe, was overheard by a neighbour walking his dog. Nothing like being confronted by a little "as others see us" perspective. The kid wasn't the only one in need of a swear jar, in other words).
At supper, I said, Let's have a family meeting. And then, When could we do it?
How about right now? said AppleApple.
The meeting was informal, which is how our family seems to operate. It was brief. It was to the point. We talked first about Haiti. Everyone but Albus offered ideas about how we could help. Then we talked about finding ways to express our emotions appropriately. Again, Albus was silly rather than receptive. I was feeling rather hopeless. Are we in for a decade of defensive eye-rolling? But fortunately, Kevin picked up the ball and asked Albus what he thought about what we were discussing. After some hedging and more silliness, he slipped closer to seriousness. And that's when we came up with the penny jar idea. I'm not even sure whose idea it was, in its final rendering. One jar, into which we'd put enough pennies to rent a movie plus buy some candy, the other jar, which would receive a penny every time we used a bad word--but more than that. Every time someone behaved in a way that was not respectful to someone else. It would be a family jar, not an individual jar. We'd have to earn our reward together. Any money in the "respect jar" would be given away.
We're only on day two, but it's a good thing this week is a short week--movie night will be on Saturdays. I've noticed that I frequently (to myself and under my breath) use words I consider to be disrespectful. Every time, I drop in another penny. This will hopefully begin to take effect on my behavior. Albus is certainly taking it to heart. Respect is a concept we can all grasp. The idea is that we help each other to be more respectful rather than pointing fingers or accusing.
We shall see ...
And I liked that family meeting. It was noisy and chaotic, but everyone got a chance to speak. We must make it a regular occurrence.
That photo above is what's happening RIGHT NOW upstairs. Everyone in the playroom (my office) playing Playmobil, Daddy watching soccer on the internet.

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